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Deutz

Tech Tip #217: How to Order a Deutz 1011 / 2011 ESO in Two Easy Steps

Electronic shut off solenoids on Deutz engines are high mortality items. They fail frequently and can be hard to identify, but we can help. Take a look at the chart below for two easy steps to identify the Deutz ESO that you need. We bet you can identify 99% of shut down solenoids used on Deutz 1011 / 2011 engines with this chart.

Model of Engine

1011F / 2011
1011 (non-F)

# of Prongs on Plug
2

3

While the 2 prong ESO is no longer available, don’t worry. When it comes to Deutz, we’ve got you covered. We have a simple plug ‘n play adapter harness that lets you convert from 2 to 3 prongs.
Once you have identified which solenoid you need, you can order it from our website by clicking HERE.
However, if you have a Deutz 1011 / 2011 engine in a JLG aerial lift, this engine takes a special actuator. Call us at 800.233.6539 for discounted pricing as high as 40% off Deutz list price on a genuine OEM solenoid.

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Tech Tip #215: The Ins and Outs of Engine Block Heaters

Many of our customers run engine block heaters in their Perkins, John Deere, Deutz and other industrial engines.  As with everything else in life, there are some things you should know about before you can get the most out of a block heater.
 
 
 

Block heaters usually are rated at 150 Watts

They do a good job of maintaining coolant temperature, but only if plugged in at normal operating temperatures. When you come back from a job at night, plug in the block heater into the wood chipper, backhoe or whatever when the engine is still warm.
 

Avoid Cold Soaks

Block heaters are not going to do a good job of warming up an engine when it has been parked outside and not run for a day or two. If the engine coolant, lube oil and the engine block itself drops to a low outside temperature, say 0º F, that is called “cold soak” and you are in for a struggle. So, plug the engine in every night just after you shut it down.

Double up

In extreme circumstances, say northern Maine in January, with a large Perkins Series 1106.6 diesel powered wood chipper that is parked outside or a Perkins Series 1300 engine in a generator at a remote site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan you can install two block heaters.
 

Avoid Ether

Dr. Diesel™ says that when you are tempted to use ether, just put the spray can down and back away slowly from the engine. Go inside for a cup of coffee instead.  We have all the sales of new short blocks that we can handle!
 
We hope that this Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip has been helpful. We believe that Tech Support Matters™ and publish this ongoing series of Tech Tips for the industrial engine community. We welcome your feedback. Foley stocks and has ready to ship engine block heaters for most industrial engines including Perkins, Deutz, John Deere, etc.
To contact Dr. Diesel™ directly, email him at DrDiesel@FoleyEngines.com. For parts and service for your Deutz, Perkins, John Deere or Ford engine call us directly at 800.233.6539. International customers can call us at 508.753.2979.

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Tech Tip #213: Working on a Deutz 511 engine? Here’s How to Find the Serial Number

This tech tip follows other earlier ones on Deutz serial number locations. Please see Tech Tip #199: Deutz Engine Serial Number Location Made Easy and our Videos section on our website for more help on finding the serial number on your Deutz engine.
The Deutz 511 is a widely-used engine that is found in Bobcats as well as other small industrial machines.  It is important to have the engine serial number when you call us to order parts for your Deutz 511.  Here is how to find it.
Deutz 511 Serial Number Location
Your serial number is located on the fuel lift pump side of the engine. It is located on a flat spot to the right of this pump. The photo displayed here shows the fuel lift pump and where the serial number is located in conjunction with the pump.
 
 
How it Reads

The serial number is displayed vertically and is usually 7 digits in length. The photo displayed here shows a sample engine serial number.

 

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Tech Tip #203: Deutz and Perkins Turbocharger Maintenance Made Easy

This Tech Tip, one of a number we publish for the engine community, discusses the importance of proper maintenance of your Deutz or Perkins turbocharger.
Turbochargers are an important component in industrial engines, especially smaller Deutz engines. They are engineered to add power throughout the engine operating range without changing the size of the engine package. More power in the same package is always good.
Keeping the turbocharger and associated systems well maintained has a big impact on overall engine efficiency and will save you money.
When installing a new turbo it is important to use one of our turbo installation kits. These usually include new studs or bolts and the correct gaskets. At the same time we suggest changing the engine oil. It is important to use quality oil, like Shell Rotella, and to change the lube oil regularly. If the engine oil and filters are not changed regularly the lubrication qualities of the oil will break down. The lube oil will “coke” if the turbo is not “warmed-down” prior to shutting off the engine. This can lead to turbocharger bearing failures and other engine issues requiring costly repairs.
Along with the engine lubrication system, the intake and exhaust systems also play an important role in turbocharger efficiency. If these systems are not maintained in peak operating order, they can lead to decreased turbocharger life. A defective turbocharger has a negative impact both on engine performance and your bottom line.
The air intake and exhaust systems are both important. A clogged air filter, as well as leaks in the intake or exhaust system, reduces air flow that can result in excess smoke, increased oil consumption, low power complaints and noisy turbocharger operation. We strongly recommend you install a pre-cleaner whenever possible. Both Turbo II and Centri make good pre-cleaners and good insurance.
On a Perkins engine the charge air cooler is another important component to maintain. As the turbocharger compressor wheel compresses the air intake condenses the air before entering the combustion chamber. Warmer charge air leads to a lower charge air density and higher combustion temperatures resulting in loss or power, torque and increased emissions.
When used in aggregate screening plants and concrete saws, Deutz 1011 and 2011 turbos are high maintenance/high mortality items. Accordingly, we are unable to offer a warranty on turbos used in aggregate industry applications. Again, we strongly encourage turbo owners, especially those running screening plants, to install pre-cleaners ahead of their air cleaners and to put their engines on an oil analysis program.
For more information on how to properly install and maintain your new or remanufactured turbocharger check out Tech Tip #190: Turbocharger Installation Instructions on our website.

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Tech Tip #200: Rebuilding Deutz Connecting Rods

The Deutz 912 series diesel engine, while a rugged, long lasting engine, can be tricky to rebuild. Take the connecting rods, a very important component of a compression firing engine. On a Deutz 912 these rods come in two different styles: weighted and unweighted and can’t be used interchangeably.
The problem comes in when you are rebuilding the connecting rods and trying to determine which style you have
Here’s how to tell them apart.
The unweighted style rod uses a 19 mm rod bolt (see Deutz part number 223 5520) which accepts a 6 point socket.
The weighted style rod takes a 13 mm rod bolt (see Deutz part number 423 4117) which also accepts a 6 point socket.
These two rod styles use the same 35 mm rod bushing (Deutz part number 337 1612).
We believe that having good connecting rods is very important so we supply new rod bolts and rod bushings along with a free Deutz Workshop Manual with all of our Deutz overhaul parts kits.
We offer additional information on how to rebuild Deutz and Perkins connecting rods on other Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tips. See for example

Tech Tip #76: The Nuts and Bolts of Con Rod Reconditioning,
Tech Tip # 165: Deutz 912 Diesel Connecting Rod Bolts, and
Tech Tip: #6: Diesel Rod Reconditioning

for more information.

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Tech Tip #199: Deutz Engine Serial Number Location Made Easy

Recent Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tips have sought to help people find and unscramble the serial numbers found on their engines.
This Tech Tip focuses on how to find the serial number on a Deutz engine. This is very important because Deutz parts are serial number dependent.  In other words, the vast majority of Deutz parts vary according to serial number and the parts are not “all the same” as the saying goes.
See for example

Tech Tip #150: How to Identify Deutz 912 Engine Fuel Injectors,
Tech Tip #86: Deutz Diesel Fuel Systems: How to Identify the Correct Deutz 912 Diesel Series Fuel Pumps and Injectors, and
Tech Tip #174: Five Points to Keep in Mind When Overhauling a Deutz 1011 or Deutz 2011 Diesel Engine

for more information on Deutz engines and parts.
Below you will find examples of where to find the engine serial number for the different Deutz industrial engine models.
Deutz 912, 913 and 914 Engines
Figure One displayed below shows the three serial number locations on air cooled Deutz 912, 913 or 914 engines.

The first location where you will find the engine serial number is a metal tag located just below the head at the right-rear of the 912 engine.
The second location for the serial number is a metal tag located on the block, just below the starter motor.
The third location is a stamped-in serial number to the right of the fuel injection pump at the front of the engine.
Deutz 1011, 1011F, and 2011 Engines
Figure Two displayed below shows the four serial number locations on Deutz 1011, 1011F, and 2011 engines.
The first and most common place to look is on the valve cover.
The second location to look on this engine is the side air shroud.
The third location, and usually the last resort, is to look on the engine block toward the rear of the engine.  In this area the engine serial number is stamped into the block vertically.  This one is more difficult to find because of its location.  However, this stamping is almost never removed.
The fourth location where you will find the engine serial number is on a tag behind the fuel filter.
Deutz 1012, 1013, 2012, and 2013 Engines
Figure Three displayed below shows the two serial number locations on Deutz 1012, 1013, 2012, and 2013 engines

The first location to look is below the oil filter.  This is the area where the Deutz Factory installs the specification tag.
In the event that the spec tag is missing Deutz also stamps the engine serial number on the engine block toward the rear of the engine just above the gear drive hydraulic pump mount.
Deutz 1015 and 2015 Engines
Figure Four displayed below shows the two serial number locations on Deutz 1015 and 2015 engines.
These engines have a tag riveted to the engine on the front top right portion of the engine block.  In the event that the tag is missing, the engine serial number is stamped in the same location.
Take a look at our instructional videos Deutz 912 / 913 Engine Serial Number Location and Deutz 1011 / 2011 Engine Serial Number Location for visual help with finding the serial number on your Deutz engine.

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Tech Tip #193: Deutz 1011 and Deutz 2011 Electronic Shutoff Solenoids

This Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip focuses on the electronic shut off solenoid as used on Model 1011, 1011F and 2011 engines. The electronic shut off solenoid, which people refer to as “ESO”, is a very high mortality item on Deutz engines. We sell a ton of them. Because we sell so many of these solenoids we decided to find out why they fail.
For more information on Deutz ESOs check out Tech Tip #160: Deutz Diesel Electronic Solenoid Selection.
After Market Single Coil Deutz ESOs
Many aftermarket versions of this ESO are constructed differently from the genuine version. They often have a single coil, operating at continuous power and high amperage. They tend to overheat and fail often. See for example part number 428 7116.
Genuine Dual Coil Deutz ESOs
Genuine Deutz 1011/2011 electronic shut off solenoids, for example part number 4190 3812, have two coils. One coil runs at high amperage to open the arm on the solenoid. The second coil holds the arm open at low amperage. This prevents the shutdown solenoid from overheating and failing.
Electronic parts can be tricky. They may even look alike. See the photograph of two Deutz ESOs above on the left. An aftermarket ESO is on the left and a genuine Deutz ESO is on the right. They may look alike, but you never know what is inside. As a result, we think that you should only buy a genuine Deutz ESO and not try to save a dollar or two with an aftermarket version.
Why Buy Sketchy? Why Buy Junk?
All in all, most aftermarket Deutz ESOs are pretty sketchy because with their single coil they often overheat and soon fail. Moreover, we don’t think you should buy a replacement ESO from a company relying on a couple of cell phones and a flashy website. We think you can do better. Much better. We think you would be better off relying on an engine company that has years of experience with Deutz. A company who actually stocks Deutz engines and 20,000 square feet of Deutz engine parts.

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Tech Tip #184: How to Break-In a Remanufactured Deutz Engine

How to Break-In a Re-manufactured Deutz Engine
General
The lube oil you choose to run in your Diesel engine plays a vital role in the ability of the engine to operate safely, achieve a long life, and have a minimal impact on the environment. Considering today’s modern engines, the lube oil has to meet some very exacting standards to achieve those goals.
In general, diesel engine oil must meet the following requirements:

Retain sufficient viscosity at all operating temperatures to assure a lube oil film between mating parts.
Remain stable at all variable engine operating temperatures.
Perform cleaning and cooling functions.
Prevent corrosion.

API Classification
In order to meet these requirements successfully, it is imperative that the correct lube oil classification is met. The American Petroleum Institute works with engine manufacturers and oil suppliers to establish classifications criteria suitable to meet those demands.
SAE Grade (Society of Automotive Engineers)
Equally important is the SAE grade of the engine oil that is used. The SAE grade selected should be chosen based on the highest ambient temperature at the engine operating site. If the lube oil grade used is to thin oil will pass by the piston rings into the combustion space.  Lube oil API Classification and SAE Grade requirements can be found in the engine operators’ manual and should be adhered to.
Oil Consumption
During engine operation, some lube oil will be consumed. Lube oil provides a seal between the piston rings and the cylinder wall and during the combustion process, some of the “sealing oil” will burn and travel out the exhaust valve. The amount of oil burnt during the process is influenced by several factors, but will generally fall in a range of from 0.3% to 0.5% of overall fuel consumption. (In cases of continuous low power demand, as high as 0.7% may be normal)
Break-In
Due primarily to more exacting machining tolerances and more stringent quality measures, modern diesel engines require less “break-in” than their predecessors did. Most engines however, will experience higher than normal lube oil consumption during the initial period of operation, which depending on the load factor applied, should stabilize within the first 150 to 200 hours of operation. During this time, the pistons rings are “seating”, or forming a perfect seal with the minute variances that exist between the rings and the cylinder wall. It’s important to understand that this process is greatly influences by the load applied to the engine during its early life and as long as the engine is demonstrating a decrease in oil consumption, this means that the “break-in” period is still occurring and more time (hours of operation) may be necessary.
Extended Periods of Low Load
Engines subject to extended periods of low loads (or prolonged periods of idling) will at the very least take longer to seat the piston rings, and extreme cases, may not do so at all. Low loads or extended idling will cause incomplete combustion and the formation of a carbon compound which will essentially fill the crosshatch shaped grooves that are applied to the cylinder wall. When the occurs, the cylinder surfaces develop a “mirror finish” becoming “Glazed”, causing oil pumping past the rings up into the combustion chamber where the oil will partially burn and be pushed out into the exhaust system. The liquid oil passing into the exhaust system can result in leakage at the exhaust manifold gaskets and “wet stacking”. The carbon compound that forms the glaze on the cylinder wall is very hard, but is caught early applying full load on the engine on the engine may correct the condition. Otherwise, the cylinders will need to be “de-glazed” with a honing tool and the piston rings replaced. Of course after replacing the piston rings the “break-in” period will start over again.
Summary
Select the correct oil by consulting the operator’s manual. When the engine is new, try to limit the idle time of the engine by shutting the engine down when the machine is not in use. It’s best to apply a heavy load to the engine during the “break-in period” in order to seat the rings as quickly as possible. Sufficient load will assure a rapid “break-in” period and good piston ring sealing.
Lube oil consumption is expressed as a percentage of the fuel consumption during a test period of about one day. The calculate consumption, top off both lube oil in the engine and fuel in the tank. Then operate the engine for a full work day and measure the exact amount of lube oil and fuel necessary to bring both back to the “full” level.
Oil Consumption % = Quarts of lube oil added / Gallons of fuel used X 4
 

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Tech Tip #180: EPA Tier 3 Deutz Engine Specs

#180: EPA Tier 3 Deutz Engine Specs

 
 

 2009 Series
 2011 Series
914 Series

Water – Cooled
26 – 67 HP
1.7 – 2.3 L
3 & 4

Oil & Water Cooled
30 – 99 HP
1.6 – 3.6 L
2, 3 & 4 Cylinders

Air – Cooled
57 – 174 HP
3.2 – 6.5 L
3, 4, 5 & 6 Cylinders

       (specs)
       (specs)
       (specs)

 
 

 2012 Series
2013 Series
 2015 Series

Water – Cooled
88 – 208 HP
4.0 – 6.0 L
4 & 6 Cylinders

(specs)

Water – Cooled
139 – 326 HP
4.8 – 7.2 L
4 & 6 Cylinders

(specs)

Water – Cooled
322 – 670 HP
12.0 – 16.0 L
6 & 8 Cylinders

(specs)

US EPA Tier 3 Industrial Range

Engine Type

Cyl & Config

FIE Control

Cooling Type

Industrial Ratings ISO 30461

Max Torque

Bore/Stroke

Displ

Dimensions2

Weight3

hp

kW

rpm

(ft lb @ rpm)

(mm)

(l)

L in|mm

W in|mm

H in|mm

lb | kg

2009 Series

D 2009 L4

3 IL

Mech.

Water

37

28

3000

79@1600

90|90

1.72

23.5|597

19.3|490

24.1|612

397|180

D 2009 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

48

36

3000

111@1600

90|90

2.29

26.7|680

19.3|490

24.1|612

452|205

TD 2009 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

67

50

2800

140@1600

90|90

2.29

27.4|696

20.4|518

24.9|633

463|210

2011 Series (Integrated Cooling)

D 2011 L2 I

2 IL

Mech.

Oil

31

23

2800

66@1700

94|112

1.6

19.2|487

17.8|451

26.9|683

385|175

D 2011 L3 I

3 IL

Mech.

Oil

49

36

2800

101@1700

94|112

2.3

23.6|599

17.8|451

26.7|678

475|216

D 2011 L4 I

4 IL

Mech.

Oil

62

46

2600

140@1700

96|125

3.6

28.0|710

17.8|451

28.1|713

595|270

TD 2011 L4 I

4 IL

Mech.

Oil

75

56

2600

184@1600

96|112

3.6

28.0|710

20.9|530

28.1|713

589|267

2011 Series (External Cooling)

D 2011 L2

2 IL

Mech.

Oil

32

24

2800

69@1700

94|112

1.6

16.1|408

17.8|451

26.9|683

372|169

D 2011 L3

3 IL

Mech.

Oil

49

37

2800

103@1700

94|112

2.3

23.6|599

17.8|451

29.9|673

462|210

D 2011 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

67

50

2600

148@1700

96|125

3.6

28.0|710

17.8|451

28.1|713

573|260

TD 2011 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

91

68

2600

207@1600

96|125

3.6

28.0|710

19.5|495

28.1|713

571|259

TCD 2011 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

99

75

2600

258@1600

96|125

3.6

28.0|710

19.5|495

28.1|713

571|259

914 Series 

D 914 L3

3 IL

Mech.

Air

57

43

2300

149@1500

102|132

3.2

27.7|703

27.4|696

31.3|795

626|284

D 914 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Air

78

58

2300

199@1500

102|132

4.3

31.9|811

27.4|696

31.3|795

694|315

D 914 L5

5 IL

Mech.

Air

97

72

2300

249@1500

102|132

5.4

37.7|959

57.4|696

32.8|833

860|390

D 914 L6

6 IL

Mech.

Air

116

87

2300

509@1500

102|132

6.5

42.7|1084

26.6|676

34.8|885

970|440

TCD 914 L6

6 IL

Mech.

Air

174

130

2300

861@1600

102|132

6.5

49.7|1262

28.3|720

38.9|988

1124|510

2012 Series 

TD 2012 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

88

66

2300

258@1600

101|126

4.0

34.0|864

27.0|680

32.0|822

871|395

TCD 2012 L4

4 IL

Mech.

Water

118

96

2400

310@1600

101|126

4.0

34.0|864

27.0|680

32.0|822

871|395

TCD 2012 L4

4 IL

Electronic

Water

138

103

2400

384@1600

101|126

4.0

34.0|864

27.0|680

32.0|822

871|395

TCD 2012 L6

6 IL

Electronic

Water

208

155

2400

597@1600

101|126

6.0

44.0|1125

29.0|748

36.0|905

1116|506

2013 Series

TCD 2013 L4 2V

4 IL

Mech.

Water

139

104

2200

420@1500

108|130

4.8

37.6|954

24.7|628

38.9|987

1113|505

TCD 2013 L4 2V

4 IL

Electronic

Water

173

129

2300

494@1600

108|130

4.8

37.6|954

24.7|628

38.9|987

1113|505

TCD 2013 L6 2V

6 IL

Electronic

Water

268

200

2300

811@1500

108|130

7.2

50.0|1269

25.9|657

39.9|1013

1349|612

TCD 2013 L6 4V

6 IL

Electronic

Water

326

243

2100

966@1450

180|130

7.2

52.1|1324

27.6|700

43.0|1091

1455|660

2015 Series

TCD 2015 V6

6 V

Electronic

Water

483

360

2100

1535@1300

132|145

12.0

37.3|857

37.0|940

44.9|1150

1874|850

TCD 2015 V8

8 V

Electronic

Water

671

500

2100

2133@1400

132|145

16.0

46.3|1187

36.7|940

44.9|1150

2558|1160

(1) Power ratings flywheel net, without deduction of fan power consumption.  All power ratings refer to the run-in engine (50-100 operating hours).  For all indicated ratings, tolerances of +/- 5% apply according to ISO 3046, 88/195/EEC, 89/491 EEC.
(2) Dimensions refer to standard applications.
(3) Weight of engine ready for operation according to DIN 70020, part 7A, without starter, alternator and lube oil, but for air cooled engines it includes complete cooling system, for water-cooled without radiator.

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Tech Tip #178: Deutz 1012/1013 Cooling System Purge Instructions

Deutz 1012/1013 Cooling System Service and Maintenance
Cleaning Intervals

The amount of contamination in the cooling system depends on the engine applications.
Spilled oil or fuel on the engine increases the risk of contamination. Be especially careful if the engine is used in dusty environments.
Serious contamination can occur for example:

on construction sites where thee is a high  level of air-borne dust.
in harvesting applications where there are high concentrations of chaff and chopped straw in the vicinity of the machine

Because applications vary, cleaning intervals have to be determined from case to case. The cleaning intervals given in the table below can be used as a guide.

Suggested OH
Application

2000
Ships, gensets in enclosed spaces, pumps

1000
Vehicles on paved roads

500
Tractors, forklift trucks, mobile gensets

250
Vehicles on construction sites and unpaved roads, construction equipment, compressors, underground mining equipment

125
Agricultural machinery, harvester tractors

Cleaning Cooling System
FOR THE ENTIRE GUIDE, DOWNLOAD THE PDF BELOW.
Cooling System Guide
 

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