Oldest Industrial Engine Distributor in North America / A+ Rated by BBB

Perkins

Tech Tip #215: The Ins and Outs of Engine Block Heaters

Many of our customers run engine block heaters in their Perkins, John Deere, Deutz and other industrial engines.  As with everything else in life, there are some things you should know about before you can get the most out of a block heater.
 
 
 

Block heaters usually are rated at 150 Watts

They do a good job of maintaining coolant temperature, but only if plugged in at normal operating temperatures. When you come back from a job at night, plug in the block heater into the wood chipper, backhoe or whatever when the engine is still warm.
 

Avoid Cold Soaks

Block heaters are not going to do a good job of warming up an engine when it has been parked outside and not run for a day or two. If the engine coolant, lube oil and the engine block itself drops to a low outside temperature, say 0º F, that is called “cold soak” and you are in for a struggle. So, plug the engine in every night just after you shut it down.

Double up

In extreme circumstances, say northern Maine in January, with a large Perkins Series 1106.6 diesel powered wood chipper that is parked outside or a Perkins Series 1300 engine in a generator at a remote site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan you can install two block heaters.
 

Avoid Ether

Dr. Diesel™ says that when you are tempted to use ether, just put the spray can down and back away slowly from the engine. Go inside for a cup of coffee instead.  We have all the sales of new short blocks that we can handle!
 
We hope that this Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip has been helpful. We believe that Tech Support Matters™ and publish this ongoing series of Tech Tips for the industrial engine community. We welcome your feedback. Foley stocks and has ready to ship engine block heaters for most industrial engines including Perkins, Deutz, John Deere, etc.
To contact Dr. Diesel™ directly, email him at DrDiesel@FoleyEngines.com. For parts and service for your Deutz, Perkins, John Deere or Ford engine call us directly at 800.233.6539. International customers can call us at 508.753.2979.

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Tech Tip #208: Perkins 1000 Series Connecting Rods: Fractured or Serrated?

This Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip, one of now more than 200 we publish for the industrial engine community, discusses how to identify the connecting rods in a Perkins 1000 Series engine. This Tech Tip follows in the path of others we have published that were concerned with Perkins connecting rods including

Tech Tip #76: The Nuts and Bolts of Con Rod Reconditioning
Tech Tip #6: Diesel Rod Reconditioning.

The Perkins 1000 Series engine replaced the familiar Perkins 4.236 and Perkins 6.354 Series engines in the mid-1990s. It is easily distinguishable from the earlier 4.236 and 6.354 by the gear driven water pump mounted off to one side on the front of the engine versus the belt driven center mount water pump on the earlier engine. Rebuilding a 1000 Series is no more difficult than rebuilding a 4.236 or a 6.354. Some of the Perkins 1000 Series, typically the naturally aspirated, non-turbocharged models, don’t even have liners just parent-bore cylinders which are re-machined at overhaul time.
One troublesome area though is the connecting rods and bearings. Early 1000 Series engines use the familiar serrated or “manufactured” connecting rods and later engines used “fractured” rods. It is important that rebuilders accurately identify which connecting rod they have. Different bearings are used depending upon if the rods are serrated or fractured.
Unfortunately, the engine build list (for example, AQ 12345) and even the complete engine serial number (for example, AQ 12345U1234567S) sometime don’t accurately tell which rods are in the engine. Moreover, over time the engine’s connecting rods may have been changed or updated to the more modern fractured style, but here is how to tell the difference.
Rod Bolts vs. Capscrews
The earlier connecting rods have conventional rod bolts with washers, plus the bearings themselves have a locking tang. The later serrated rods which as noted above take different bearings have capscrews with no washers and no locking tang.  Simple as that: bolts with washers with bearing tangs or capscrews without tangs on the bearings.

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Tech Tip #203: Deutz and Perkins Turbocharger Maintenance Made Easy

This Tech Tip, one of a number we publish for the engine community, discusses the importance of proper maintenance of your Deutz or Perkins turbocharger.
Turbochargers are an important component in industrial engines, especially smaller Deutz engines. They are engineered to add power throughout the engine operating range without changing the size of the engine package. More power in the same package is always good.
Keeping the turbocharger and associated systems well maintained has a big impact on overall engine efficiency and will save you money.
When installing a new turbo it is important to use one of our turbo installation kits. These usually include new studs or bolts and the correct gaskets. At the same time we suggest changing the engine oil. It is important to use quality oil, like Shell Rotella, and to change the lube oil regularly. If the engine oil and filters are not changed regularly the lubrication qualities of the oil will break down. The lube oil will “coke” if the turbo is not “warmed-down” prior to shutting off the engine. This can lead to turbocharger bearing failures and other engine issues requiring costly repairs.
Along with the engine lubrication system, the intake and exhaust systems also play an important role in turbocharger efficiency. If these systems are not maintained in peak operating order, they can lead to decreased turbocharger life. A defective turbocharger has a negative impact both on engine performance and your bottom line.
The air intake and exhaust systems are both important. A clogged air filter, as well as leaks in the intake or exhaust system, reduces air flow that can result in excess smoke, increased oil consumption, low power complaints and noisy turbocharger operation. We strongly recommend you install a pre-cleaner whenever possible. Both Turbo II and Centri make good pre-cleaners and good insurance.
On a Perkins engine the charge air cooler is another important component to maintain. As the turbocharger compressor wheel compresses the air intake condenses the air before entering the combustion chamber. Warmer charge air leads to a lower charge air density and higher combustion temperatures resulting in loss or power, torque and increased emissions.
When used in aggregate screening plants and concrete saws, Deutz 1011 and 2011 turbos are high maintenance/high mortality items. Accordingly, we are unable to offer a warranty on turbos used in aggregate industry applications. Again, we strongly encourage turbo owners, especially those running screening plants, to install pre-cleaners ahead of their air cleaners and to put their engines on an oil analysis program.
For more information on how to properly install and maintain your new or remanufactured turbocharger check out Tech Tip #190: Turbocharger Installation Instructions on our website.

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Tech Tip #195: How to Identify Perkins 4.107 and 4.108 Lift Pumps

The Perkins 4.108 engine, both the marine and industrial versions, is getting long in the tooth. Unfortunately, parts are steadily drying up. The Perkins 4.108 predecessor, the Perkins 4.99 and the Perkins 4.107, also referred to as the Westerbeke 40, are even older and those parts are increasingly hard to find. But because we’ve been in business for a long time (100 years to be exact) we can help.
To support people like you, we stock over 20,000 square feet of Perkins engine parts. Take the fuel lift pump, a common maintenance item for a diesel engine. Foley stocks both the lift pump for the Perkins 4.99/4.107 as well as for the later Perkins 4.108. We also have the high pressure fuel injection pumps.
Because the lift pumps are a high mortality item and are different and not interchangeable, we want to point out the differences to help you order the correct lift pump. As you can see from the photos below, the early Perkins 499/4.107/Westerbeke 40 pump has a two bolt mounting flange and the later Perkins 4.108 has a four bolt flange.  Moreover, the early pump has a long rod on the side of the pump. The late pump does not.

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Tech Tip #192: Perkins 4.107/4.108 Stainless Steel Exhaust Elbows

The tech tip below is one of a number that we publish for the engine community. This one focuses on the maintenance of the Perkins 4.107/4.108 and the Westerbeke 40. It specifically focuses on the exhaust elbow and square mounting flange where the elbow is mounted. For more information on Perkins parts and maintenance check out

Tech Tip #60: Perkins Exhaust Elbows and Flange: Now in Stainless Steel! and
Tech Tip #70: Perkins/Westerbeke Elbows and Flanges (Part 2).

Perkins exhaust elbows and flanges lead a tough life. Made from cast iron or aluminum they tend to quickly rot out and fail. Not only do elbows fail quickly, they can be expensive. List price on the replacement elbow for the Perkins 4.108 is over $1200. Equally important, as of the spring of 2015 there were none here in North America. But Foley can help.
We now offer stainless steel mixing elbows and accompanying flanges for the Perkins 4.107/4.108 and Westerbeke 40 engines. They correspond to “Elbow B” and “Flange A” in Foley Tech Tip #60: Perkins Exhaust Elbows and Flange: Now in Stainless Steel! The flange has Perkins OEM part number of 37426472 and a list price of $749.
While you are changing the elbow and flange, be sure and change your raw water pump impeller. A failed exhaust elbow and the resulting back pressure inside the pump will damage the impeller. For more information on this, check  out “An Engine with a Fever” in Good Old Boat Magazine’s March/April 2015 issue. It is a very informative article.

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Tech Tip #188: Perkins Engine Number and Location Guide

#188: Perkins Engine Number and Location Guide
Year of Manufacture Code

This code indicates the calendar year of manufacture.
The letters I, O, Q, R, and Z will not be used.

A – 1974
M – 1985
B – 1996

B – 1975
N – 1986
C – 1997

C – 1976
P – 1987
D – 1998

D – 1977
S – 1988
E – 1/1/99-31/3/99

E – 1978
T – 1989
F – 1/4/99-31/12/99

F – 1979
U – 1990
G – 2000

G – 1980
V – 1991
H – 2001

H – 1981
W – 1992
J – 2002

J – 1982
X – 1993
K – 2003

K – 1983
Y – 1994
L – 2004

L – 1984
A – 1995
M – 2005

Country of Manufacture Code

This code indicates the country in which the basic engine was manufactured.

A – Argentina
HM – Indonesia
P – Poland

B – Brazil
HK – Iraq
S – India

C – Australia
HU – Uruguay
SA – South Africa

D – Germany
J – Japan
T – Turkey

E – Spain
K – Korea
U – UK

F – France
L – Italy
V – Pakistan

G – Greece
M – Mexico
W – Iran

H – Group
MX – Mexico
X – Peru

HC – China
N – USA
Y – Yugoslavia

A – Air to Air Charge Cooling
H – Horizontal

C – Compensated
N – Narrow Front End

CC – Charged Cooled
P – Timing Chain

D – Direct Injection
S – Spark Ignition

E – Electronic
T – Turbocharged

F – Federal Emissions
U – Unit Injection

FF – Federal Emissions
V – V Form

G – Gasoline/Gas
W – Water to Air Charge Cooling

 
Engine Number Guide

Example:
TU 30008 U 510256 F

Engine Family & Type Code:
TU

Parts List # or SOS Order Ref. #:
30008

Country of Manufacture Code:
U

Engine Serial #:
510256

Year of Manufacture Code:
F

 
Engine Number Location Guide

Engine Type
Position

3.152
M

4.108
A

4.154/200 Series
B

4.165
B or G

4.203
J or N

4.212
C

Engine Type
Position

4.236
C or L

4.248
C

4.318
F

4.41
H

6.247
C or F

3.354
D

V8540
Q

Engine Type
Position

V8.640
P

700 Series
K

900 Series
C

Perama/100 Series
O

Prima/500 Series
E

Phaser/1000 Series/ 1100 Series
H or J

Peregrine/1300 Series
I or O

 

Engine Family and Type Code

A
Phaser/1004 Series
DK
1103A-33T
 
1004D Series
UF
804C-33T

AA
1004-4
E
4.108 Series
NH
1004D-E44T
V
1106C Series

AB
1004-4T
ED
4.108
NJ
1104D-E44TA
VK
1106C-E60TA

AC
1004-4T
G
4.154/200 Series
NK
1104D-44
W
1300 Series Peregrine

AD
1004E-4TW
GA
4.154
NL
1104D-44T
WB
1306-8T

AE
Fed CC
GB
4.135
NM
1104D-44TA
WC
1306-8TA

AF
1004-40S
GC
4.182
 
1106D Series
WD
1306-7T

AG
1004-4
GD
4.25
PJ
1106D-E66TA
WE
1306-7TA

AH
1004-4T
GE
4.30
R
3.247 Series
WF
1306-8T NGD

 
New 1000 Series
H
4.165 Series
RA
6.247
WG
1306-8TA NGD

AJ
1004-40
HA
4.165
 
1004C Series
WH
1306-9T NGD

AK
1004-40T
 
400 Series
RE
1104C-44
WJ
1306-9TA NGD

AL
1004-40TA
HB
402C-05
RF
1104C-E44
 
1300 Series EDI

AM
1004-40T
HD
403C-07
RG
1104C-44T
WK
1306-E76T

AP
1004-40
HH
403C-11
RH
1104C-E44T
WL
1306-E76TA

AQ
1004-40T
HL
403C-15
RJ
1104C-44TA
WM
1306-E87T

AR
1004-42
HN
404C-15
RK
1104C-E44TA
WN
1306-E87TA

AS
1004-42
HP
404C-22
 
1104A Series
WP
1306-E76T

AT
1004-40TA
HR
404C-22T
RR
1104A-44
WQ
1306-E76TA

B
Prima/500 Series
J
4.203 Series
RS
1104A-44T
WR
1306-E87T

BA
504-2
JD
4.203
SD
Sabre CC6.68
WS
1306-E87TA

BB
504-2T
JE
D4.203
T
6.354 Series
X
V8.540 Series

C
3.152 Series
JF
G4.203
TC
6.354
XA
V8.510

CA
P3
JG
4.2032
TD
H6.354
XB
TV8.510

CB
3.144
K
Perma/100 Series
TE
T6.354
XC
V8.540

CC
P3.144
KD
3 cyl, 1.0 litre
TF
HT6.354
XE
TV8.540

CD
3.152
KE
3 cyl, 1.5 litre
TG
6.3541
 
1103D Series

CE
D3.152
KF
4 cyl, 2.0 litre
TH
T6.3541
XK
1103D-33

CF
G3.152
KH
3 cyl, 1.3 litre
TJ
6.3542
XL
1103D-33T

CG
P3.152
KL
3 cyl, .07 litre
TK
C6.3542
XM
1103D-33TA

CJ
3.1522
KN
2 cyl, 0.5 litre
TP
T6.3543
Y
Phaser/1006 Series

CM
3.1524
KR
4 cyl, 2.2 litre
TR
6.372
YA
1006-6

CN
T3.1524
KS
3 cyl, 1.1 litre
TT
TC6.3541
YB
1006-6T

 
900 Series
L
4.236 Series
TU
T6.3544
YC
1006-6T

CP
903-27
LA
4.212
TV
6.3724
YD
1006E-6TW

CR
903-27T
LD
4.236
TW
6.3544
YE
Fed CC

CT
903-27S
LE
G4.236
TX
C6.3544
YF
1006-60S

D
1103C Series
LF
4.248
TY
H6.3544
 
New 1000 Series

DC
1103C-33
LG
4.2482
TZ
HT6.3544
YG
1006-60

DD
1103C-33T
LH
C4.236
U
700 Series
YH
1006-60T

 
1103B Series
LJ
T4.236
UA
704-30
YJ
1006-60TA

DF
1103B-33
LM
4.41
UB
704-26
YK
1006-60TW

DG
1103B-33T
N
4.318 Series
UC
704-30
Z
V8.640 Series

 
1103A Series
NC
4.318
 
800 Series
ZA
V8.640

DJ
1103A-33
ND
4.3182
UE
804C-33
ZB
TV8.640

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Tech Tip #173: How to Remove a Perkins 4.108 Injection Pump in Two Easy Steps

Foley has long specialised in Perkins diesel engines beginning in the mid-1960s when as a Perkins distributor we repowered tractor trailer trucks with 6.305 Perkins engines. (The Mass Pike and NY State Thruway have never been the same.) This Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip is one of a number of tech tips we publish on maintaining Perkins diesel engines. For examples of others see

Tech Tip #17: Working on Deutz or Perkins Engines?,
Tech Tip #74: 8 Reasons to Remote Mount Your Perkins or Deutz Oil Filter, and
Tech Tip #69: Working on Deutz, Deere and Perkins Engines? 7 Steps to Waking Up the Hibernating Engine—Gently; as well as our
YouTube video on how to find your Perkins 4.108 engine serial number.

This Tech Tip focuses on how to remove a Perkins 4.108 fuel injection pump. People frequently call us with questions about removing their 4.108 high pressure injection pump and what size wrench to use. The pump is held on by three nuts and three bolts.
Step 1: First Unbolt the Injection Pump Drive Gear Bolts
On a Perkins marine 4.108, the drive gear is directly behind the raw water pump. On a Perkins industrial 4.108, the front gear cover must be removed to gain access to the Perkins 4.108 injection pump drive gear. After disconnecting the fuel injection lines, use a 12mm socket to remove the three bolts that are located at the very front of the injection pump which holds the pump drive gear to the pump.
Step 2: Then Unbolt the Pump from the Block
After these three bolts are removed, use a 13mm socket to remove the three nuts that hold the injection pump to the block. The pump is now free. Had you first removed the three nuts that held the pump to the block, the pump would have flopped around making it difficult to unbolt the injection pump drive gear.
P.S. This might be a good time to replace the awful cartridge-style secondary fuel filter on your Perkins 4.108 with a modern spin-on fuel filter. Please call us for details on our Perkins 4.108 conversion kit. It makes bleeding your fuel system much, much easier, saving batteries and relationships. See Tech Tip #112: Spin-on Fuel Filters for Perkins Diesels on our website for more information.

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Tech Tip #170: All You Need to Know to Install a Deutz, Perkins or Deere Crankshaft

This Tech Tip is one of a number we provide for the industrial engine community. It follows an earlier Tech Tip on crankshafts; Tech Tip #83: Deutz Diesel Crankshafts: A Cautionary Note and  focuses on Deutz, Perkins, and John Deere crankshafts. This Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip gives some handy hints on how to install a new Deutz, Perkins or Deere crankshaft.
Crankshaft Installation Tips

First things first. All connecting rods, connecting rod caps, and main caps should be marked before disassembly, so they may be reinstalled in their original positions.
Inspect the bores. Rod and main bearing bores should be inspected with a dial bore gauge. Any housing bore which measures out of spec should be resized. You should recondition the connecting rods. (See Tech Tip #6: Diesel Rod Reconditioning, Tech Tip #76: The Nuts and Bolts of Con Rod Reconditioning, and Tech tip #165: Deutz 912 Diesel Connecting Rod Bolts for information on using new rod bushings and rod bolts) and align hone the block as part of their regular engine rebuilding procedure.
Inspect the journals. The crankshaft’s journals must be within manufacturer’s tolerances. They must be smooth and free of burrs. Everything must be spotlessly clean.
No abrasives! Never use an abrasive on the bearing surface prior to installation. The bearing may be as thin as .0005″ (12.7 microns). Any abrasive will reduce bearing life.
Install assembly lube on dry surfaces. We use a mixture of STP and motor oil as assembly lube. The bearings should be lubed and then positioned in the rod or main saddles dry before crankshaft installation. Bearing surface finish should be 60-90Ra.
No nicks. Exercise extreme care when installing the rods. Use Foley rod bolt protectors on the rods to prevent nicks to the crankshaft.
Clean threads. Bolt threads should be cleaned and lightly lubricated.
Check bearing clearances with Plastiguage.
Properly torque all bolts. We supply free Workshop Manuals and free Foley coffee cups with our overhaul kits. Review the specs over a cup of coffee!
Pre-lubricate the engine prior to starting. Many newer engine designs use a crankshaft driven oil pump that can’t be driven by a drill motor. Using a commercially available pressure lubricator facilitates pre-lubrication of virtually any engine

For parts and service for your Deutz, Perkins or John Deere engine call us directly at 800.233.6539. International customers can call us at 1.508.753.2979. We stock, and have ready to ship, brand new Deutz, Perkins, and Deere crankshafts. Usually they cost less than welding and regrinding your shaft locally. Plus, as new shafts, they last a lot longer than a welded shaft. We have a full century (we were founded in 1916) of experience helping people running Deutz, Perkins, and John Deere industrial Engines.

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