This Tech Tip focuses on installing the unit injection pumps on Deutz 1011 and 2011 engines. The only tool you will need to purchase, is an adjusting pin for the injection pump control rod. This tool is very inexpensive and is shown above. You should also invest in a Deutz workshop manual, which we can email to you.

First things first, please remember to install these pumps one pump at a time, not all at once.
Press on the end of fuel rack (behind from cover right above camshaft) to ensure that rack is moving back and forth freely with your old two pumps installed.
If moving freely, compress the rack just a little bit until you can line up the hole in the rack to the pin hole for the pin.
Screw in the pin just enough so that the rack is no longer moving freely and is now locked into place.
With the roller tappet installed in the new injection pump hole, you will want to rotate the crankshaft until this tappet is resting as far down as it can go. You can place your fingertip into the hole right on top of this tappet to gauge the depth as you rotate the crankshaft. You will want the tappet to be sitting right on the lowest/flattest point on the camshaft (the lobe on camshaft should be pointing downwards).
Once you find the lowest resting position on the camshaft, you will then install your shim followed by your injection pump.
Tighten down injection pump to block. Once torqued down, you will then want to pull the finger-loop pin out of the injection pump (this pin should have been pre-installed into the injection pump that was purchased from us). The removal of this long pin out of the injection pump will engage this pump into the rack and synchronize with remaining injection pumps.
Once you have removed the pin from the injection pump, you will then want to unscrew the pin to unlock the fuel rack and allow it travel freely once again. Be sure to test and ensure that rack is moving freely and not sticking.
Re-plug the timing hole with the original bolt removed from this hole.
Move onto the next pump in sequence.

Dr. Diesel™ would like to thank Bryce Rogers for his assistance with this helpful Tech Tip.
For more information on Deutz 1011 and 2011 engine injection pump installation check out this Deutz Tech Bulletin.

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This Dr. Diesel™ Tech Tip focuses on the electronic shut off solenoid as used on Model 1011, 1011F and 2011 engines. The electronic shut off solenoid, which people refer to as “ESO”, is a very high mortality item on Deutz engines. We sell a ton of them. Because we sell so many of these solenoids we decided to find out why they fail.
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